Category: Red blood cell identification quiz

Red blood cell identification quiz

Blood provides a mechanism by which nutrients, gases, and wastes can be transported throughout the body. It consists of a number of cells suspended in a fluid medium known as plasma. The cells of the blood consist of erythrocytes, platelets, and leukocytes or white blood cells.

Erythrocytes are responsible for transporting gases. The cells of the blood are important because they are a readily accessible population whose morphology, biochemistry, and ecology may give indications of a patient's general state or clues to the diagnosis of disease.

For this reason, the complete blood count CBC and the differential white cell count are routinely used in clinical medicine. It is very important to be able to recognize normal blood cells and to distinguish pathological cells from the normal variants.

The identification of blood cells is based primarily on observations of the presence or absence of a nucleus and cytoplasmic granules. Other helpful features are cell size, nuclear size and shape, chromatin appearance, and cytoplasmic staining. The chart at the end of this section explains what to look for in the effort to identify the component cells of a blood smear. Erythrocytes, or red blood cells, are by far the predominant cell type in the blood smear.

They appear as biconcave discs of uniform shape and size 7. Red blood cells have a characteristic pink appearance due to their high content of hemoglobin.

The central pale area of each red blood cell is due to the concavity of the disc. Also visible in this slide are several platelets, which play a crucial role in the blood clotting cascade.

Neutrophils are by far the most numerous of the leukocytes. They are characterized by a nucleus that is segmented into three to five lobes that are joined by slender strands. The cytoplasm of neutrophils stains a pale pink.

Its primary larger granules contain acid hydrolases and cationic proteins, and its secondary smaller granules contain a variety of antimicrobial substances used to destroy bacteria that they phagocytose during the acute inflammatory response.

Eosinophils are larger than neutrophils and are distinguished by bilobed nucleus and large red or orange granules of uniform size.

These granules contain major basic protein, which is released to kill organisms too large to phagocytose, such as parasites and helminthes worms. Basophils are intermediate in size between neutrophils and eosinophils and have simple or bilobed nuclei. They contain many coarse purple granules that can vary in size or shape. These granules contain histamine, which is released to cause a vasoactive response in hypersensitivy reactions, and heparin, which is an anticoagulant. Basophils are not phagocytic.

Lymphocytes can appear either small or large. The small lymphocyte is about the same size as an erythrocyte and contains a dark nucleus with a thin rim of surrounding cytoplasm.

Lymphocytes do not contain visible granules. Small lymphocytes are inactive. Large lymphocytes 10 - 15 microns contain more cytoplasm than small lymphocytes, and the cytoplasm remains basophilic. Large lymphocytes are active B or T cells.White blood cells are much less common than red blood cells. There are five types of white blood cell leucocyte. These are divided into two main classes. This classification depends on whether granules can be distinguished in their cytoplasm using a light microscope and conventional staining methods.

All the white blood cells are able to move like an amoeba, and can migrate out of blood vessels into the surrounding tissues. Note - it is easy to confuse the different leucocytes in blood smears. To identify them, you need to look for the shape of the nucleus, and compare their size, relative to that of a red blood cell. Once you have looked at the examples below - have a go for yourself - click here and see if you can identify the 'mystery' cells.

This shows a neutrophil in a blood smear. There is a single nucleus, which is multilobed, and can have between 2 and 5 lobes.

Blood Groups Practical Theory Quiz

The chromatin in the nucleus is condensed. This means that there isn't protein synthesis. There are few organelles in the cytoplasm. Neutrophils are the commonest type of white blood cell found in a blood smear. Function: Neutrophils are born in the bone marrow.

They circulate in the blood for hours, and then enter the tissues. They are motile, and phagocytic and will destroy damaged tissue and bacteria. They self destruct after one burst of activity. This picture shows an eosinophil in a blood smear. You can see that eosinophils only have two lobes to their nucleus. These cells have large acidophilic specific granules - these stain bright red, or reddish-purple. These granules contain proteins that are 'destructive' and toxic.

Function : These cells are born in the bone marrow, and migrate from the peripheral blood system after a few hours, into loose connective tissue in the respiratory and gastointestinal tracts. They phagocytose antigen-antibody complexes.

They also produce histaminase, and aryl suphatase B, two enzymes that inactivate two inflammatory agents released by mast cells. A high eosinophil blood count may indicate an allergic reaction. This photo shows a picture of a basophil. The granules contain heparin, histamine and serotonin. Function : These cells are involved in immune responses to parasites. They have IgE receptors and the granules are released when the cells bind IgE. These cells also accumulate at sites of infection, and the release of prostaglandins, serotonin and histamine help to increase blood flow to the area of damage, as part of the inflammatory response.

The degranulation - release of histamine also plays a role in allergic reactions such as hay fever. This is a photo of a lymphocyte in a blood smear. These larger cells have more cytoplasm, more free ribosomes and mitochondria. Lymphocytes can look like monocytes, except that lymphocytes do not have a kidney-bean shaped shaped nucleus, and lymphocytes are usually smaller. Larger lymphocytes are commonly activated lymphocytes. They have a small spherical nucleus and has abundant dark staining condensed chromatin.

B-cells develop in the bone marrow. T cells are born in the bone marrow, but are matured in the Thymus.By Barbara Liang. In this animated and interactive object, learners examine the red blood cell's life cycle and function.

A brief exercise completes the activity. Click here to login. By Carolyn Byom. This learning object will help the student identify normal blood cells and their functions.

Blood Groups Practical Theory Quiz

This will include the identification of red blood cells, five types of white blood cells, and platelets. White Blood Cells. In this animated and interactive object, learners examine the structure and functions of granulocytes and agranulocytes. Two exercises complete the activity.

The Skull Screencast. By Eileen Bouchard.

Blood cells identification quiz( check your WBC identification ability)

In this screencast, we'll view the 10 major bones of the skull and read a description of each bone. Traumatic Brain Injury and Occupational Therapy. By Bab Smith, Ann Jadin. The learner explores the cognitive levels associated with brain trauma and develops a treatment plan for a patient. In this animated and interactive object, learners examine ABO blood antigens and Rh antigens and their compatibility. Learners read a general description of the function and structure of leaves and examine drawings and microscopic views.

A matching exercise completes the learning object. By James Manto. Learners play a game of Tic-Tac-Toe to test their knowledge of normal red blood cells, platelets, and abnormal red blood cell morphology. The LO is great! I didnt realize how to rate it and mistakenly gave it a poor rating. Im sorry. It is a wonderful LO and I will use it in my medical assistant classes.

Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4. This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Privacy Policy OK. I am looking for: Learn arrow down I am looking for:. Wisc-Online Categories. This learning object uses Adobe Flash and your browser does not support Flash.

Facebook Twitter More Sharing Options. Related Questions Feedback. Watch Now.If a patient has a positive antibody screen, a request for a red blood cell RBC product transfusion will usually be delayed due to the extra testing that is now required to identify the antibody and find compatible RBCs. When a patient makes an immune antibody, red blood cell products are phenotyped and products that are antigen-negative for the corresponding antibody selected for transfusion.

RBC products are already pre-phenotyped to prevent interactions with one immune antibody. Which antibody is it? A patient has anti-c. If a patient has Anti-c and Anti-S, how many RBC units will the transfusion service need to test in order to find 2 units that are compatible with the patient?

A patient has a positive antibody screen and positive results against cells in the antibody panel.

red blood cell identification quiz

Which of the following antibodies is most consistent with these results? A patient has a positive antibody screen and a positive antibody panel. The only tested cell that is negative is the autocontrol.

You phenotype the patient and discover that he is negative for the following antigens: E, Fy aS, and Jk b. You locate a testing cell that has this antigen negative phenotype. A patient has a positive antibody screen and a positive antibody identification panel. The patient has not been transfused or pregnant in the preceding 6 months. Which technique would you use to complete the case?

A patient with sickle cell disease who was transfused 2 units of red blood cells 2 weeks ago at another facility presents to your transfusion service for the first time.

The clinician is requesting phenotypically matched red cells. What serologic technique can be used to obtain the patient phenotype in this case? Your lab performs tube testing with LISS potentiation for routine antibody screening and identification.

You identify an RBC alloantibody in a patient using your usual techniques. Which of the following antibodies could be identified using a patient specimen collected in a red top tube plain glassbut may not be identified if a purple top tube EDTA anticoagulant was used for the collection? Blood Groups Practical Theory Quiz. Choose the BEST answer: 1. Anti-Jk a. Anti-Le a. Anti-Jk b. Anti-Fy a. Allo-anti-E, -Fy a-S, -Jk b.

Allo-anti-E, -Fy a-S, auto-anti-Jk b. Warm autoantibody. Cold alloadsorption. Cold autoadsorption. Warm alloadsorption. Warm autoadsorption. No additional test is needed. Perform a cold autoadsorption on the patient specimen. Anti-S reacting at AHG phase. Anti-K reacting at AHG phase. Anti-M reacting at immediate spin phase.Random Quiz. Can you name the White Blood Cell Types? Plays Quiz not verified by Sporcle.

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red blood cell identification quiz

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You're not logged in! Compare scores with friends on all Sporcle quizzes. Log In. Remember Me. Watch our educational content, quiz creation guides, and fun videos on Sporcle TV. You Might Also Like Phases of Mitosis.You may be able to find your test results on your laboratory's website or patient portal. However, you are currently at Lab Tests Online. You may have been directed here by your lab's website in order to provide you with background information about the test s you had performed.

Lab Tests Online is an award-winning patient education website offering information on laboratory tests. The reference ranges for your tests can be found on your laboratory report. They are typically found to the right of your results. If you do not have your lab report, consult your healthcare provider or the laboratory that performed the test s to obtain the reference range.

Laboratory test results are not meaningful by themselves.

red blood cell identification quiz

Their meaning comes from comparison to reference ranges. Reference ranges are the values expected for a healthy person. They are sometimes called "normal" values. By comparing your test results with reference values, you and your healthcare provider can see if any of your test results fall outside the range of expected values.

Values that are outside expected ranges can provide clues to help identify possible conditions or diseases. While accuracy of laboratory testing has significantly evolved over the past few decades, some lab-to-lab variability can occur due to differences in testing equipment, chemical reagents, and techniques. This is a reason why so few reference ranges are provided on this site. It is important to know that you must use the range supplied by the laboratory that performed your test to evaluate whether your results are "within normal limits.

Red blood cell antibodies are proteins produced by the body's immune system directed against "foreign" red blood cells RBCs. This test identifies the specific red blood cell antibodies present in the blood of an individual who has a positive screening test for RBC antibodies an RBC antibody screen or direct antiglobulin test, DAT.

Each individual inherits a specific combination of RBC antigensstructures found on the surface of the cells, including those associated with the major blood types A, B, AB, and O.

Normally, people will only produce antibodies directed against "foreign" antigens not found on their own cells.

For example, a person who is blood type A will have antibodies in their blood to the B antigen. Antibodies to the D antigen are not naturally-occurring; a person who is Rh-negative produces antibodies only after being exposed to RBCs from another person that has the D antigen, for example, a mother exposed to her baby's RBCs during pregnancy or during a blood transfusion. Blood that is to be transfused must be compatible with the recipient's ABO and Rh blood type because ABO and Rh antibodies present in the recipient's blood have the potential to rapidly destroy hemolyze the transfused RBCs and cause serious complications.

Antibodies to the major blood types are routinely identified using blood typing tests, and blood for transfusion is matched with the ABO and Rh blood type of the recipient. For more on this, see Blood Typing and Transfusion Medicine. Antibodies to these antigens are not made naturally and are only produced by the body when exposed to them through blood transfusion or when a mother is exposed to a baby's blood cells during pregnancy, labor and delivery.

These antibodies may or may not be associated with adverse reactions, and identification of the specific type of RBC antibody present in a person's blood may be important in avoiding these reactions.Blood and Bone Marrow Lab Learning Objectives Identify the component cells of a typical blood smear Identify the hematopoietic precursor cells of a typical bone marrow smear Correlate the light and electron microscope images of red and white blood cells Distinguish the different classes of white blood cells and the conditions under which each would be expected to dominate Identify some key pathological examples related to bone marrow and peripheral blood.

Keywords This is an experimental portion of the website. Each keyword starts a script that searches for the keyword on DBpedia which is the structured data version of Wikipedia. The search returns a description to the keyword and an associated image if available. If the search does not return a results, a link to a Google search is presented. Pre-Lab Reading Introduction Blood provides a mechanism by which nutrients, gases, and wastes can be transported throughout the body.

It consists of a number of cells suspended in a fluid medium known as plasma. Serum refers to plasma after clotting factors and fibrin have been removed. The cells of the blood are important because they are a readily accessible population whose morphology, biochemistry, and ecology may give indications of a patient's general state or clues to the diagnosis of disease.

For this reason, the complete blood count CBC and the differential white cell count are routinely used in clinical medicine. It is very important to be able to recognize normal blood cells and to distinguish pathological cells from the normal variants.

The identification of blood elements is based primarily on observations of the presence or absence of a nucleus and cytoplasmic granules. Other helpful features are cell size, nuclear size and shape, chromatin appearance, and cytoplasmic staining. The chart at the end of this section explains what to look for in the effort to identify the component cells of a blood smear. A blood smear is created by placing a drop of blood near the end of a clean glass microscope slide.

Another slide is held at an angle, backed into the drop, and then smoothly dragged forward to spread the blood film along the slide. The blood must then be fixed, stained, and washed.

When you view a properly prepared blood smear of a healthy individual, there are several populations of cells that you will notice. Keep in mind that these are all mature cells.

The next section will discuss the identification of the immature cells of the bone marrow. Monomorphonuclear leukocytes are cells with round, non-lobed nuclei These include:. Polymorphonuclear leukocytes are cells with lobed nuclei and cytoplasmic granules. While these cells share the same primary nonspecific or azurophilic granules, they are named based upon the characteristics of their secondary specific granules.

While the peripheral blood smear indicates the status of mature blood cells, the bone marrow smear can be used to assess the process of hematopoiesis, or blood cell formation. Active bone marrow appears highly cellular.

White Blood Cell Differential Simulator

The majority of the developing cells will become erythrocytes, which confer a red color to the marrow. For this reason, active bone marrow is also known as red bone marrow. Over time, the marrow becomes less active and its fat content increases. It is then referred to as yellow bone marrow.


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